Posted in brilliant ideas, church, coping, kids, Teaching

Cut and Paste Noah’s Ark lesson

This lesson goes with the Primary 6 book, Lesson 8

BACKGROUND:

Imagine you have a Sunday school class of 11 year old kids. You are trying to teach them about the Old Testament.

This was me several years ago and I was at a loss of what to do.

Here’s why:

One of my kids couldn’t read really at all. So having her read a scripture at all. Ever. Was. torturous.

Having someone else read didn’t solve the problem either because she wouldn’t pay attention at all and would cause problems when other people read because she couldn’t pay attention for that long.

Then one of my other students was a bit ADHD and really had no patience for any kind of long “discussion” at all (and by long I mean more than 30 seconds).

I felt like as 11-year-olds they should be learning a bit more of the details of the scriptures but I wasn’t sure how to get there without reading…or talking…for too long.

After the first couple weeks of basically complete disaster lessons, I came up with this idea because it kept their hands busy and it was something that shifted very fast and kept their attention. These lessons were for the most part 10 times more successful than any other attempts with a regular lesson.

What I did was I started drawing these pictures and cartoons and things to teach the lesson. I’d like to say I spent hours on them but honestly most of the time I was scrambling to finish them during Sacrament Meeting while wrestling my then two-year-old boy and two girls. How I ever did even one is a miracle.

I got them copied before class and that was it, gather up some good scissors and glue sticks and we were set.

The first 5-10 minutes was spent cutting out the pieces: they were old enough to do it themselves and I would sit with them and chat about school and their week, etc. Depending on the need, I would direct them to sort the pieces before we started.

I also cut out my own to use as a model while we talked.

Next, I went through the lesson, told stories, discussed and all the while putting the whole thing together. When we finished, they were supposed to color it…but to be honest, they rarely did, haha.

I was stoked for all the info we got through, how much they focused, and how much they actually retained (I would give them small quizzes about the previous weeks’ lesson as we cut out pieces and I could ask them anything it seemed! Amazing!!!)

Their reaction wasn’t as stoked, more like “huh. Cool.” when it was time to go, like “wow, that wasn’t miserable,” which coming from 11 year olds is a compliment, right?

This is my handout for Primary 6 (green book), lesson 8: “Noah and the Flood”

This is what the handout looked like at the beginning:

Then once we went through the lesson, the finished product looked like this:

The handout was intended to prompt me to explain each part so we actually discuss the whole story. I didn’t really write down a script, I just picked up pieces and discussed them as we went along.

Here is the script as I remember it:

First, what story do you think we are going to talk about today? Yes, It’s Noah and the Ark. (glue on Big Noah). How would you feel if the Lord asked you to build a boat when you were no where near water?

Who was Noah’s wife? (glue her next to Noah) What was her name? What do you think she thought about her husband’s project?

Who else was on the Ark with Noah? Can you guess? Yes, he had three sons and his sons had wives (glue them along the bottom of the boat like they are getting on)

What are their names? Japheth, Shem and Ham (glue their names over the top of each couple)

Alright, now what else was on the Ark?

FOOD! (Glue on two baskets of apples) Noah and his family had to bring on enough food to last for however long they would be on the boat so they had a lot of preparing to do to store enough for the journey. How much food do you think you would have to bring if you were going on the Ark?

What else did they bring? ANIMALS!

Now, when you were younger, I’m sure you always just heard “two of each” but actually, for some animals, they brought SEVEN of each…whY? Because they used some of them to actually eat! So They brought 7 of the birds like the chickens and the geese because they intended to eat some of them for dinner during the journey.

Glue on the animals they did NOT eat: the pigs, the cows, the elephant, the giraffe, the crocodile, and the bugs. Next to these animals, glue on “x2”

Next glue on the birds and glue next to them “x7”

Now who else was on the earth at this time? Did Noah have any other relatives?

Well, the first one that is pretty significant is Noah’s Grandfather, Methusaluh. Now Methusaluh was the last relative in Noah’s line that was alive he died ONE YEAR before the flood started. Methusalah is an interesting guy. His father was Enoch! And even though he was good as well, he was told to stay on Earth when everyone else was taken to heaven. He saw the VERY BEST people could be, and he also saw the VERY WORST they could be. He saw his friends and relatives taken up to heaven and he saw his friends and relatives reject the gospel and turn away from God. And if you look at when everyone older than him died, Methusalah was alive when ADAM was alive and even all of his great great and great grandfathers. He could have and probably did meet in person all of his “fathers” since Adam himself.

Now, here is a basic map of Adam and Eve’s children. We know the story of Cain and Abel but the scriptures say that Adam and Eve had many other sons and daughters that are not mentioned by name.

Now after Cain murdered Abel and became wicked, anyone who was associated with him came to be called “The brethern of Cain”

 

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